"Required reading" for today's smart writer.

"Required reading" for today's smart writer.
As featured on: Pro Blogger, Men With Pens, Write to Done, Tiny Buddha, LifeHack, Technorati, Date My Pet, South 85 Literary Journal and other award-winning sites.

Monday, November 14, 2016

How to Negotiate Great Perks for Your Work!


Raise your hand if you've ever had to turn down a creative gig because the client couldn't afford your going rate. It's happened to me more times than a few.

But what I've learned is that pay should not always be the determining factor in whether or not to accept a potential client or assignment.

Here are some other factors to consider:
  • The mission or associated cause of the organization (.i.e. domestic violence, Cancer awareness, education reform) and whether it is in alignment with your belief system, interests or leanings
  • The initial chemistry with the client
  • Your future goals
  • How much work is involved or the hours required to fulfill the position
There is great validity to the expression, "Money ain't everything."

Accordingly, here are some other perks that you can negotiate to provide for a great "compensation package" in the future.


 
1. PAYMENT TERMS
If you can't receive the compensation you feel you deserve, at least strive to get it in your hands sooner. In other words, ask to be paid upon acceptance as opposed to payment after publication.

2. DISCOUNTS AND FREEBIES
A cash-strapped client may have limited funds, but they may have other goods, products or services that would be beneficial. For example, one client seeking to hire me, allowed me free membership in one of her membership organizations for writers. This saved me hundreds of dollars over the year.

3. THE ABILITY TO CHOOSE YOUR OWN TOPICS WITHOUT PITCHING
I tend to be a pretty prolific writer. I'm rarely without a W.I.P.
So, for me it saves time and mental wear and tear if I'm allowed to choose what I write about; as long as it fits the clients' needs and profile.

4. A GENEROUS BIO & BYLINE
Which can often be used to promote your products or attract new clients. This can be done through links and mentions to your other sites in your Bio.

5. DEADLINE FLEXIBILITY
With some of my clients I have as much as a 5 day gap in when the final work is due each month. In cases of emergency or illness, this can be a big blessing.

6. A GLOWING TESTIMONIAL OR REFERENCE 
An impressive reference or testimonial can go a long way in gaining future business. It's a great form of "social proof." Ask and you shall receive.
Here's an example of some of mine.
http://penandprosper.blogspot.com/p/testimonials-from-clients.html

ON A FINAL NOTE...

As a business grows, or a client is able to become more profitable, often there is the possibility of a  future pay raise. Sometimes it's six months after the sign on date or maybe a year. It's always worth discussing as an option, to sweeten the deal.

These are just a few ways to create work arrangements that put you in the driver's seat and that enable you to be "enriched" regardless of pay.
Make sure to consider them, (and when possible to include them) in your contract negotiations with clients for 2016/2017.

Thoughts? Agree or disagree?  Which is your favorite?

10 comments:

  1. Jennifer--Perks are always nice. If cold hard cash isn't possible, something else that's desirable is the next best thing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Welcome back to the block, Sioux. :-) Good to re-connect. Perks can be lovely. Especially if they save you money or provide for free, things that you would likely purchase. Thanks for stopping by.

      Delete
  2. Excellent points, Jen. Though I usually prefer money, I've gained other perks through my writing. For example, one parenting magazine doesn't pay their writers, but they do offer me a sizable ad in exchange for my articles. (The ad value is $250.) Most of my online teen writing students have signed up through these ads, so it does translate to money in the long run.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Karen,

    You'll get no argument here: I usually prefer cash, too. :-) However, sometimes writers must wheel and deal like a hostage negotiator, if we want to survive. :-) Appreciate your feedback, as always.

    ReplyDelete
  4. My dentist in Atlanta offered to trade his services for some SEO writing he needed done. I moved to Jamaica (dental work is so much cheaper here than in the states) before I could take him up on it, but that would have been worth THOUSANDS.

    So yeah, "trades" can work!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good example, Yuwanda! Thanks for adding to the discussion here.

      Delete
  5. Bartering is a great way to get a little bang but not much buck. Whatever works for you and the client. Karen's ad space is a perfect example. Thanks for always inspiring me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I could say the same thing about you. :-)

      Thanks for taking the time to add to the mix, Lin.

      Delete
  6. For what compensation and freebies is concerned, years ago when I worked at a big (Music) Entertainment Company, I noticed a freelance writer frequently hanging around in our buildings.

    I noticed that it is a great place for a freelance writer to hang around, because the buildings are Always buzzing with Music Business people.

    Making it a great place to meet people and have meetings, (excellent visual- and sound equipment!) there also are lots of trade magazines to read.

    ReplyDelete