"Required reading" for today's smart writer.

"Required reading" for today's smart writer.
Information & inspiration to hone your craft and increase your cash...Since 2009

Tuesday, March 31, 2020

How to Find Work as a Freelance Writer*Guest Post





Finding work as a freelance writer can be tough. It’s easy to make mistakes or get confused, but finding work isn’t impossible--otherwise, why would I be writing about it? There are plenty of ways to find work. Let’s go over a few of them, so you can get your writing on.

 In this article, you’ll learn:

  • Where you can find freelance work
  • Why you should niche-down
  • How to start your portfolio for free

Build up a Portfolio of Written Pieces

Is there anything worse than applying for entry-level jobs that also require two years’ experience?
One of the perks of starting a freelance writing career is that you can get your own portfolio together quite easily--even if you haven’t had a paid writing job yet!

Your portfolio can be completely free, you’ll only need a few word documents of your best quality work that you can send to editors and hiring managers. Although you would benefit from putting a few dollars aside and hosting your own basic website to host your work on.

As someone who has hired before, receiving links to published articles feels more legitimate. But if the quality of writing is great, I wouldn’t let a portfolio of Google Docs stop me from hiring someone who’s good at what they do.

You can also build your portfolio on a free publishing platform like Medium. In fact, there are a bunch of great freelancers who use Medium as a way to promote their work.

Another way to pad out your portfolio is to look for guest posts. A guest post is when a blogger or website owner accepts a post from another writer. It’s an old-fashioned win-win; the website owner gets free content for their site, and the writer gets featured in front of a new audience. Being published on someone else’s website is a great way to build credibility.

Your portfolio will get better over time, so don’t stress about not having guest posts or a viral Medium-published post. Instead, get applying as soon as possible and get your name (and work) out there!

Prepare a Writing Resume

A writer’s resume involves more than just a portfolio. You’ll give the hiring manager or editor a little more information about you and your work.
Now, when you’re starting out, your portfolio will speak a lot louder than your resume will. In fact, some editors won’t even look for a resume and go straight for a portfolio. However, you don’t want to be frantically typing one up when someone does ask you for one, so it’s best to be prepared.

A writing resume is also incredibly handy when registering for freelance websites. When you sign up for freelancer websites (more on those in the next section), you’ll have to create a profile that hiring managers can glance over.

If your resume is up to date, you’ll simply have to copy and paste the desired information into your profile, which will streamline the entire process--that’s great if you’re applying to multiple sites.

Check out Freelancer Sites




Okay, so you’ve got your writing samples and a resume that makes you look like the awesome writer you are… Now what?

Sure, you can advertise your services on your own website, but I wouldn’t solely rely on that. Finding freelance writing gigs is simply a case of knowing the right places to look. Here are a few of the more popular job boards out there.

Upwork


Upwork is one of the biggest platforms for freelancers on the internet. There are countless gigs on the platform at any one time.
Upwork, like a lot of marketplaces, takes all sorts of jobs and freelancers on board. There’s a lot of competition on the site, so, while you’re starting out, you may have to take some low-paying gigs. Once you’ve got a reputation and some positive feedback, you can start applying for higher-paying jobs.

If you’re an absolute beginner, you can get some quick experience on Upwork, and some writers do make a great living on the platform.

Reedsy


Reedsy is a great platform for publishing professionals and freelancers to find work.
Reedsy is more suited to long-form ghostwriters, compared to writers looking for a blogging or content writing job. If you’re looking at becoming a ghostwriter, Reedsy is a solid choice.

ProBlogger Job Board


Darren Rowse’s ProBlogger Job Board is one of the best job boards out there for freelancers. Unlike other boards, it costs publishers a fee (usually around $70-100) to publish their job offerings. This extra hurdle usually weeds out a lot of low-paying websites and generally crummy jobs.
There are a lot of experienced writers who use this job board to get short-term and long-term work. The site is definitely worth a look, with new jobs posted daily.

Fiverr


Fiverr is almost like a flipped version of the freelancer marketplace. Freelancers create their productized offerings and website owners and editors browse the offers and hire a freelancer who fits.

Again, Fiverr has a lot of freelancers on the platform, so it can be hard to stand out, especially seeing the huge range in prices. However, Fiverr does have a ‘Pro’ platform that allows you to set a higher rate once you have some experience.

Freeeup


Freeeup (yes, there’s an extra e) is another marketplace, but there are a few main differences to the other freelance marketplaces.

For starters, Freeeup’s freelancers are vetted, meaning that only the best will get on board. This is great if you don’t want to compete with less-skilled writers who charge unrealistic rates.
Freeeup also introduces suitable freelancers one-by-one to the person who posted the job. That way you’ll be looked at on an individual basis and won’t be one of the thirty people who apply for a gig.

Be Professional When Applying for Jobs





It’ll probably be a tad overwhelming when you check out a job board and see dozens of jobs you’d be great for. You must remain professional when answering queries to get the best chance at a trial.

Here are some tips for answering freelancer job postings on marketplaces:

  • Answer job postings personally. More than likely, the person posting the job will leave their name. Make sure you use their name when replying.
  • Give a pitch specific to the job. It is tempting to have the same copy-pasted response for all writing jobs. While it’s handy to have a loose template you can use for responses, you’ll want to tailor it to the specific job.
  • Attach your portfolio. Attach your portfolio in your first message. Otherwise, you’re hoping the hiring manager responds to your original message asking for it.
  • Make your pitch short and to the point. There will be many applicants for writing jobs, so make sure your application doesn’t waffle on too much, otherwise there’s a chance the hiring manager will read the first line and skip the rest.
  • Make sure you don’t have any spelling mistakes! I know this sounds basic, but you’ll be surprised how many typos slip through.

Be Reliable

So much of the freelance writing world revolves around those who are reliable. You’d be surprised to know that by being a good, reliable writer, you’re better than 95% of your competition.

Keep communication open with the person hiring you. If you have any questions let them know.

Also, make sure you keep to your deadlines. For many sites, the article getting finished is usually step one of a large process. After writing, your article will need to be edited at least once, formatted, uploaded, and there’ll need to be relevant images created or sourced. So, by being a day or so late on your delivery, you’ll hold the entire process back.

Once you start putting out great work and are pleasant to work with, you’ll get recommendations and positive reviews. From there, you’ll start to get more and more work. You’ll also notice that if you’re producing good work, website owners and editors will hire you multiple times and maybe even put you on a regular contract.

Pro Tip: Choose a Niche… Trust Me


Just like any business, as a freelance writer, you’ll want to specialize in something.

Pick an area that you’re knowledgeable in or passionate about and write some sample articles about that. When it comes to landing jobs, targeted pieces will get you much further than general creative writing samples.

That way, when you get to the point where you’re marketing your services or applying for gigs on marketplaces, you’ll be able to show your expertise.

To find your niche, use what you’re experienced in writing about. Or, if you’re starting out, what you’re knowledgeable in compared to the average person. Usually, if you’re writing as a side-hustle, your day job is a great place to start thinking about a niche. For example, a teacher may specialize in education or book blogs.

Now, don’t get me wrong, you don’t have to solely apply for work in your niche, but giving yourself a specialty is important when you’re looking for decent writing gigs.

Final Thoughts


In this article, we went over a few steps that you should take to start your freelance career. Even if you’re not getting hired at the start, make sure you continue to write, as it’s the only sure-fire way to get better.

Cheers!


BIO:



Dave Chesson is the book marketing Super-Nerd behind Kindlepreneur.com. His focus is on providing in-depth, actionable information for indie authors, such as his recent guide to book writing software. His free time is spent reading, immersing himself in sci-fi culture, and spending time with his family in Tennessee.

 




Your turn.
Thoughts here? What tip or resource did you find most helpful?



Image credits: Pixabay.com



Monday, March 23, 2020

Cabin Fever From Corona Virus Isolation?

HERE'S A CURE!


Seeking ways to stay safe, sane, and reasonably maintained during the Corona outbreak?
Join the club.
With virtually everybody on mandated lockdown and in "chill mode" it makes sense to find constructive, inexpensive ways to mellow out the madness.
That is, until things return to some degree of normalcy (and I pray that they do).

Let's just think of it as an extended "stay-cation." Shall we?
So, in the mean time and in between time, I'm suggesting some "movie therapy" here  while you're at home.

In the book Cinematherapy, the Girl's Guide to Movies for Every Mood, the authors write: "Movies are more than entertainment: they're self medication. A good flick is like a soothing tonic that, if administered properly, in combination with total inertia and something obscenely high in fat grams, can cure everything from an identity crisis, to a bad hair day, to the I-hate-my-job blues."

Add to the mix a little popcorn, a bottle of wine, some chocolates or your favorite food fix.
And here's a bonus: you can indulge individually, make it a date night or establish it as family "quality time." Hello?
Be forewarned: some of the films below may have mature themes, so be sure to consult the ratings before watching them with the little ones.

ADMIT ONE...



A few of these selections are "oldies but goodies." Others will be new to some of you.


WHAT JEN RECOMMENDS:

COMEDY

  • DEATH AT A FUNERAL (VERSION WITH CHRIS ROCK)
  • ABOUT THE OTHER NIGHT (WITH MICHAEL EALY AND KEVIN HART)
  • BUCKET LIST
  • CHOCOLATE CITY (THERE'S A DANCE SCENE IN THIS ONE WITH TYSON BECKFORD THAT'S WORTH THE PRICE OF ADMISSION, LADIES).
  • MAGIC MIKE
  • HOME ALONE
  • BAD GRANDPA



DRAMA

  • ELEGY
  • STUCK (WITH STEPHEN REA)
  • RAY (WITH JAMIE FOXX)
  • QUEEN & SLIM
  • FREEDOM WRITERS
  • CHANGING LANES (WITH SAMUEL L. JACKSON)
  • CONTROL (WITH RAY LIOTTA)


ROMANCE

  • MUST LOVE DOGS
  • THE BIG SICK
  • BRIDGES OF MADISON COUNTY
  • LOVE JONES
  • CYRUS
  • OUR FAMILY WEDDING (WITH AMERICA FERRERA)

CORONA CASH-SAVING TIP:
Did you know that in most (if not all) library locations, you can check out movies and music for free? Also worth noting is that many Dollar Tree stores currently sell great movies for merely one buck.
There is no difference in the quality or selection here than at other higher paying stores and outlets.


Well, there you have it, folks...my flicks fix.
Happy viewing!

Your turn.
What would you add? Agree or disagree with the selections listed?


Image credits: 
Candy & popcorn, Pixabay.com 

Friday, March 20, 2020

A Writer's Chat With Author David Litwack, Ph.D.



Thank you for joining us today, David. We appreciate the glimpse into your world and your expertise here at Pen and Prosper.

Can you tell readers a little about your background and how you began your career as a writer, David?


So I was raised in Kansas City, which is actually two cities. One on each side of the state line. Each abutting the Great River. One in a slave state; the other in a free state. The free state took the biggest beating in the civil war. The slave state produced Jesse James. And other outlaws. I mention this because we kids were bombarded with different prejudices and history depending on what side of the river we were on at that moment. Actually, depending on which side the teachers had come from. In short, our teachers often shared their “views” to our utter confusion. But helpful in giving us a depth of understanding in the long run. Particularly as regards race relations. I found myself straddling the same issues among tribes during my years in Africa. I guess I should write about it. Oh yeah, I have. My first try has been Land of the Sun, Land without Light.)

I went to Southwest High School which, at that time, was almost an academy. Literary societies and contests were part of the culture. My parents moved us to the neighborhood for the school. I didn’t realize that until it was too late to thank them. I won some silver writing medals and was president of the literary society, Excelsior, which had some great writers. I published a little in the college literary magazine.

I was competitive but too small, weak, and slow for ball games. So I read a lot. I remember reading War & Peace at seven. Yeah, that’s seven years old. (But not in the original Russian.) I’m not sure how much I understood. But that was what I did and what made me to want to be like Tolstoy. And London. And Hemingway. And Faulkner. And so on.

I studied them in high school and college. And I ended up with a PhD in literature from Boston University. While there, I gave famous writer John Barth a copy of my latest novel to review. His response was sadly typical. Silence.

Meanwhile, most of my other scribblings spent their time in a desk drawer. Until now. I guess that could make me a (very) late bloomer.

Why do you write?


I could say I have a cluttered memory which then requires me to write things down. My memory plays useless word games and makes up stories at odd times. I write the stories down. Sometimes. I feel trapped in their insistent sway. More so as I age.

I’ve also got a snarky answer for your question, like the one proposed by Hank Williams, Jr.in his “Why do I…? song. Or as Robin Williams suggested, “to get the girls.” A bit retro, that.

Or my wanna-be answer above.
Or I could say I really like writing. Especially writing songs.

 What would it surprise others to know about you? 


I have strong political beliefs that don’t come out in my books or stories. When presenting Land of the Sun, Land without Light in an upscale cafĂ©/bar (mostly bar), a patroness asked me if the novel had a political bias. I said “none,” meaning none that would make sense to her left-right worldview. Then again, in Land there’s the well-educated rebel seeking to recover his (former) patrimony. “Liberal,” one of the entertainers shouted when I described the rebel. Then I noted that the rebel intended to impose Sharia Law once he’d overthrown the not-so-democratically elected government. Whoops! “Conservative!” another shouted.

So I’m more interested in the dynamics of politics. Examining the results only for what they do to help—or not help—the populace. Or my characters (see Land).
Also, I spent forty years in the data communications industry. Still, I am not an early adopter of technology and its offshoots. I know too well what usually happens with “early” versions.


If you could have one literary “super power” what would it be? 




To be more glib (should I say “glibber?”) with dialogue. And more dexterous with words. (Like John Prine.) And better with character development. And funnier. (Like John Prine.) That about covers it.


What philosophy do you live by? 


I believe in doing good. And that “Justice shall thou pursue.” But I also see the complexity of obeying the commandments for example. Take the commandment “Do not kill.” We could really beat that one to death. Wink-wink. It takes six hundred thirteen rules in the Old Testament alone plus over two thousand years of commentary to set all these things straight.


Any thoughts on blogging and social media--do you feel it’s a necessity these days? 


It looks like it—like they are necessities. Meanwhile, I have a web site that needs some modernizing. I’m about five years late. Cf. davidlitwack1.com. So I’m a late adopter of all things technical. (And I’m probably too lazy to blog regularly.)

 I see you’ve written in multiple genres. What’s your favorite? 


I love historical fiction. Imagining what historical characters might do if just one act or element were different. In my upcoming sequel to Land, it seems that narrator Harry and company have stumbled across the oldest humanoid fossil ever uncovered. This was in the same place where that event actually occurred, but about 10 years earlier. That is, my characters made a hash of it and lost out on world renown. The sequel’s called L’Algerie, Mon Amour (Algeria, my love). Look for it. But maybe not in your neighborhood bookstore.

I really had fun writing The Mystery of the Big Booger. Especially the illustrations because my skills in that area are limited. So Booger begs a sequel. I could use the grandkids’ help, but their growth spurts have outrun child-level reading. Any thoughts out there? Of course, you’ll have to read Booger to get a feel for this imaginary world.

All that said, I love writing songs above all. My favorite effort is “Leaving Sara Lee.” It’s about the strength and stoicism of Sara Lee. My mother. See this and other efforts at my website. Feedback will be much appreciated.

Can you give me one marketing tip to share with readers here today? 





Plan on hiring a professional with a great history to do your marketing. Get advice from professionals like Jennifer. Upon publication, cross your fingers—or however you solicit good luck.

What passion project or “cause” excites you currently? 


Current politics. I have CNN on all day (and night). Sometimes the unexpected news gets my juices flowing.

What a waste of time, you say? You should be spending that time writing, you say? Whatever . . .


Learn more about David and his projects here:

http://www.davidlitwack1.com/


Image credits: Pixabay.com

Tuesday, March 17, 2020

The Interruption of Everything* The Corona Crisis


It's eerily quiet outside. Unusual for a big city that typically roars. Particularly amid mild weather with spring on the horizon.

The hustle and bustle has been replaced with inertia, uncertainty, fear.
A trip to my local store confirms it. There's no toilet paper or hand sanitizer on the shelves.

When I went to cast my vote at the polls this morning, it was like a ghost town.
Even election judges were M.I.A.
Schools are closed. Bars and restaurants have temporarily shut their doors to the general public.
The pandemic of Covid-19 has given us cause for pause. There's so much at stake; yet so little we know.
Today's news report just revealed the first death in Illinois related to the Corona Virus. How many more will follow before there's a cure?

WHAT CAN WE LEARN...?


"AND THIS TOO SHALL PASS." 2 CORINTHIANS 4:17-18


Whenever tragedies occur I always try to find the lesson. But, I must admit... I can't get my head around this thing.
Is this a message from God? Perhaps to realign our priorities? To repent? To recognize that we are living in the "last days"? Is it a curse? A sign of the times?
I'm not sure.
What I do know is that those of us that are believers must pray and persevere.
We must not go into hiding.



"Social distancing" and limited interaction is recommended to contain the disease and prevent spreading; to avoid the potential of overwhelming our health care system.
This is a bitter pill to swallow.

Still, walls and restrictions may confine us. But they can't hold our faith "hostage."
We'll get through this, with God's grace.
Because it's gonna' take much more than "the luck of the Irish" to survive and overcome it.
Happy St. Patrick's Day.
Be safe. And love one another.
Thanks for reading.

Thoughts? How are you coping?


Image credits: Pixabay.com


Monday, March 9, 2020

Great Reads & Resources* The 3Rs Series Returns!


RECOMMENDED READS ACROSS THE WEB


START YOUR PASSION PROJECT IN 2020!

INVEST IN YOUR WRITING CAREER FOR GREATER RETURNS

WRITING TO REPAIR THE WORLD

FINDING MOTIVATION

OVER 80 WAYS TO EARN EXTRA MONEY IN 2020!

WHY YOUR 1ST DRAFT IS NOT CRAP!

HOW I MADE OVER $25,000 CREATING ONLINE COURSES IN 1 YEAR

ADVICE FOR WRITERS FROM A BOOKSTORE MANAGER


THE 7 BENEFITS OF SOLITUDE

RESOURCES AND CALLS FOR SUBMISSIONS


8 WEBSITES THAT PAY FOR REVIEWS

THE ULTIMATE LIST OF WRITING CONTESTS FOR 2020
https://blog.reedsy.com/writing-contests/

MARKET FOR CHAPBOOKS & EBOOKS

CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE SOUL UPCOMING TOPICS

                                              REVIEW



As many of you that read my blog regularly are aware, I'm a big foodie!
That's right. I love to cook and entertain family and friends.
So, I'm always excited when I find party appetizers, snacks and treats that I can put together quickly and easily; yet, make my guests feel pampered and doted over.

I'm a big shrimp fan. So when I saw Margaritaville Jerk Shrimp on sale 2 for one, I decided to give it a try.  Wow, so glad I did. For $9.99 I got two boxes and I was quite pleased.
You will be too!
It's yummy for your tummy!
I give it **** 4 stars out of 5.
My only complaint is that they don't give you more per package.
Find it at your local Jewel food store.


This concludes this Month's installment. 
Wishing you a great Women's History Month!

Thoughts? What's your favorite link or lead here? 
Holla'!

Image credits: Pixabay.com

Saturday, February 29, 2020

Former WGN-TV Segment Host Aspires to Inspire!



As I conclude my Black History Month celebration here, I am happy to feature motivational speaker, poet and former WGN-TV Minority Business Report host, Sporty King. I hope you'll make him feel welcome with your comments and questions.
Enjoy!

Hi, Sporty
CAN YOU TELL PEN & PROSPER READERS A LITTLE ABOUT WHO YOU ARE AND HOW YOU BEGAN WRITING?

I am a native of Harlem, NY now living in Charlotte, NC… moving here after 23 years in Chicago, IL. Before that I spent 4 years in Riverdale, Md after being transferred through my job at The Wall Street Journal. It was a promotion into Advertising Sales after starting my career as a Messenger in the New York office in 1975. I would retire from The Journal in 1993 as a Regional Classified Advertising Manager. In 1994 I began my Entrepreneurial journey using my poetry to uplift people’s spirits… a path inspired through my spiritual enlightenment following the path God laid out for me.
I am now an Inspirational Speaker who helps people become better listeners and master their stress, which results in improved communication skills and better relationships with the people they communicate with.
My poetry has evolved more into positive words, affirmations and acronyms than actual poems. In fact, while living in Chicago, I was on WGN’s ‘Minority Business Report,’ delivering the inspirational message on a weekly basis from 1999-2001.
I began writing revolutionary poetry at the age of 14, inspired by The Last Poets’ “When The Revolution Comes” album (1970); combined with home sickness. I had won an ABC (A Better Chance) Scholarship and attended a Private High School in Massachusetts. During our 3 week orientation I was introduced to the album and we listened to it everyday during that summer.

DO YOU HAVE A SPECIALTY AREA?

In terms of the writing, NO… because my gift is the ability to write “in the moment” and spirit of the group. I believe all “writers” have that gift of opening up to incorporate the scenery and senses of the environment. If there is a pattern in your writing I believe it is by choice… then refined.

WHAT IS YOUR MISSION OR PURPOSE AS A WRITER? OR IS IT SITUATIONAL?



It’s actually situational and purposeful. One of the services I offer is called ‘Share the Conference.’ What I do is listen to the speeches and main topics discussed throughout the day and create an inspirational poetic wrap up that incorporates the synchronicity in the messages. I also do this serving as Emcee, a role I call “Master of Listening.”

WHAT ONE TIP CAN YOU GIVE TO ASPIRING WRITERS SEEKING TO BUILD A PLATFORM AND INCREASE THEIR ODDS FOR SUCCESS IN THIS INDUSTRY ?

Because you are creative, learn to control your vocabulary rather than allowing your vocabulary to control you. Every word must have multiple meanings. When someone else says they have “Writer’s Block,” ask them to write about who’s standing on the north, south, east and west corners of the Block they grew up on...


WHO ARE SOME OF YOUR LITERARY INFLUENCES OR ROLE MODELS?

Gil Scott Heron and The Last Poets, as mentioned. However, I have always had a wide range of love and appreciation for the poetry I began studying in high school: Robert Frost’s “The Road Not Taken” still connects to my belief in living a life of no regret, and making positive choices based on the information we have at hand. When we get more information we make different choices (not necessarily better).
I’ve been inspired by and blessed to have met Gwendolyn Brooks and Sonia Sanchez. Brooks’ personalized autograph calling me an “Old Friend” smiles from my wall. We had met twice, years apart, and she remembered me from the first. I was a DJ in my late teens/early twenties, so enjoyed the rappers like Kurtis Blow and Sugar Hill Gang. I love Malcolm X and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s mastery of words.

Learn more at SPORTYKING.COM

Thursday, February 27, 2020

How to Give Your Readers the Red Carpet Treatment


Welcome back readers,
Over the last few months there has been a lot of talk and TV air time devoted to various celebrity awards programs for film, Black achievement and music, honoring industry excellence.
Adoring fans host viewing parties, cheer on their favorite stars, and often plan future movie, book and music purchases based upon winning categories, speeches and performances.

And whether we realize it or not, there is much to be garnered from this yearly recognition and love fest for bloggers. Here's the 4-1-1- hon: we as bloggers are "performers" too. That's right.
With the only major distinction being that we "entertain" a virtual audience and are void of million dollar contracts (at least most of us).

Think about it. Bloggers have fans and followers; conduct product endorsements; influence public opinion; produce videos that go viral; and entertain the masses. 

Accordingly, here are 6 ways to go "Hollywood" and give readers the "Red Carpet" treatment:




1. DRESS THE PART

"Dazzle" your fans with a blog that's attractively designed, free of glaring errors, and that reflects quality content.

2. BE SERVICE ORIENTED 

"Perform" to the best of your ability.  Remember the W.I.I.F.M. Factor. Which translated means "what's in it for me?" Your readers should receive something in exchange for their valuable time.
Deliver by addressing their pain points; being a valuable resource; and assisting them with their goals.

3. GO BIG OR GO HOME! 

Sure, it's easy to start a blog; many have. But, can you go the distance? Week after week? Month after month? Year after year? Come up with fresh, relevant, interesting information? 
It's a tall order. Still, consistency is key to getting noticed and being trusted.
You better work it! (Insert snapping fingers here).

4. ENGAGE

Everybody's busy these days. Still, no matter how far you "rise" or how popular you become, it's good to keep in mind how you got there. Hello? Don't snub. Respond to comments placed on your blog, even if it's a brief statement of thanks. Or tell a joke or two. Whatever "floats your boat."

5. BE CLEAR ABOUT THE COMPETITION

Although blogging is a very welcoming and supportive community categorically, we are still in friendly competition. Yep. There’s always someone waiting in the wings to “woo” your fans and turn their heads. Did you know that according to Statista.com, “The number of bloggers in the United States is set to reach 31.7 million users in 2020?" Like it or not, each of us are in competition for the valuable time and attention of today’s busy readers. Step up your game to stand out, stay relevant and be remembered.

6. SHARE THE SPOTLIGHT

"The more the merrier."  Invite fellow bloggers to provide guest posts; do interviews; or collaborate on creative projects. Allowing others to shine is a great way to forge important alliances and offer diversity for your audience.


Follow these six timely tips to provide the ultimate reading experience for your "fans" and followers.
Champagne optional. :-)


Thoughts? What would you add?


Image credits:

Pixabay.com